Past Spring Soirées For Preservation

2016

Saturday, April 9

O.P. Wickham House

616 South Seventh StreetOpening Cocktail Reception – Guests receive house assignments 

OWNER/HOST:  Lloyd Menard
ADDRESS: 616 South Seventh Street
YEAR BUILT: 1882
STYLE:  Queen Anne/Eastlake
NRHP LISTED:  June 18, 1979

Owen P. Wickham was a contractor with the firm Wickham Bros. Construction Co. He was also a brick manufacturer. The house was built for O.P. and his wife Cecilia. It is a Queen Anne/Eastlake style house with concrete trim and features outstanding Victorian woodwork on both the interior and exterior. O.P. and James Wickham, built many of the brick streets and commercial buildings in and around Council Bluffs. Their work was seen at the Grand Hotel, the original Pottawattamie County Courthouse and St. Francis Zavier and St. Peter Catholic churches.

Burke / Woodward House

510-oakland-aveOWNER/HOST:  Kurt Arends and Ken Freudenburg
ADDRESS: 510 Oakland Avenue
YEAR BUILT: 1887
STYLE:  Richardsonian Romanesque
NRHP LISTED:  Within Lincoln-Fairview Historic District

The house, built of Sioux Quartzite from Jasper, Minnesota, in 1887 in the Richardsonian Romanesque style for attorney Finley Burke and his wife Parthenia. Burke was an attorney for the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. German carpenters finished the interior and today it still retains its impressive character and finish. After Burke’s death in 1903, his widow sold the house to John G. Woodward and his wife, Hattie. Woodward was the founder of the John G. Woodward and Co., one of the largest candy companies west of the Mississippi.

Everest House

125-s-3rd-streetOWNER/HOST:  James Kieffer, Jr. and Gary Lopez
ADDRESS:  125 South Third Street
YEAR BUILT: 1908
STYLE:  Tudor Revival
NRHP LISTED:  Within Bluff/Willow/Third Street Historic District

The house was designed by J. Chris Jensen and built in 1908 for Frank Everest and his wife Florence (Folsom) Everest. Frank was president of Greenshield-Everest Real Estate Company and president of First National Bank. The Tudor Revival style house retains the original walnut paneling in the foyer, walnut trim in the living room, and oak woodworks, a built-in cabinet and wainscoting in the dining room. This was the boyhood home of Frank and George Everest, who became generals.

Johnson House

OWNER/HOST: Barbara and Roger Johnson
ADDRESS: 372 Lincoln Avenue
YEAR BUILT: 1870s
STYLE: Queen Ann cross-gabled

Johnny Johnson owned the land from 1867 to 1887, but there is no indication the Johnsons ever lived in the home still standing on the site. Originally small, with five rooms, the initial part of the Victorian cross-gabled house features intricate wood trim, all original. After falling into disrepair, the home was restored, with the damaged floors on the main level replaced with flooring from the print shop at the Omaha Stockyards.

Mossman House

190 12th Avenue, Sears RoebuckOWNER/HOST:  Clark Fry & Susan Meidlinger
ADDRESS:  190 Twelfth Avenue
STYLE: Sears Roebuck Mail Order Kit (Craftsman)
YEAR BUILT: 1911

Richard Mossman’s home was built in 1911 from a Sears Roebuck kit (Craftsman)  – a very popular practice in areas served by a rail line. The owner could construct it from detailed instructions or hire someone to build it. Once converted to apartments and, later, a museum, it once again is a single-family home.

Officer House

Officer-228FifthAveOWNER/HOST:  Mary and Kent Madison
ADDRESS:  228 Fifth Avenue
YEAR BUILT: 1920
STYLE:  American Foursquare
NRHP LISTED:  Within Bluff/Willow/Third Street Historic District

This home was built for Charles and Edith Officer. Charles had his own firm on Broadway, dealing in real estate, loans, rentals and insurance.

2015

Saturday, April 11

Bennett House

333-willow-aveOpening Cocktail Reception – Guests receive house assignments 

OWNER/HOST:  Patricia Murphy
ADDRESS: 333 Willow Avenue
YEAR BUILT: 1880
STYLE: Mid-Victorian Italianate
NRHP LISTED: Within Bluff/Willow/Third Street Historic District

This house was built for John & Charlotte Bennet. John Bennett was one of Council Bluffs’ earliest settlers. Bennett served as county treasurer, county auditor and alderman. In 1888, he became head cashier for the State Savings Bank.

The house has maintained much of its original condition and features beautiful interior molding and fireplaces, frosted glass doors, an ornate staircase and many period appropriate light fixtures.

Burke / Woodward House

510-oakland-aveOWNER/HOST:  Kurt Arends and Ken Freudenburg
ADDRESS: 510 Oakland Avenue
YEAR BUILT: 1887
STYLE:  Richardsonian Romanesque
NRHP LISTED:  Within Lincoln-Fairview Historic District

The house, built of Sioux Quartzite from Jasper, Minnesota, in 1887 in the Richardsonian Romanesque style for attorney Finley Burke and his wife Parthenia. Burke was an attorney for the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. German carpenters finished the interior and today it still retains its impressive character and finish. After Burke’s death in 1903, his widow sold the house to John G. Woodward and his wife, Hattie. Woodward was the founder of the John G. Woodward and Co., one of the largest candy companies west of the Mississippi.

Cavin House

Cavin-150ParkAveOWNER/Host: Marie and David Huggins
ADDRESS: 150 Park Avenue
YEAR BUILT: 1887
STYLE: Eclectic Queen Anne and Gothic Revival
NRHP LISTED: September 27, 1984

This home was built for Thomas and Emma Cavin. Thomas Cavin was owner of several mercantile stores and, finally, floor manager for the John Beno Co. Once converted to apartments, the home has been restored to a single family home.

Davis House

davis-526.3rdstOWNER/HOST:  Gina and Chad Primmer
ADDRESS:  526 South Third Street
YEAR BUILT: 1916
STYLE:  Eclectic-Prairie/Italian Renaissance
NRHP LISTED:  Within Bluff/Willow/Third Street Historic District

Fred R. Davis was president of Pioneer Implement Company. It was later the home of Marie and L. C. Bussey, owners of Broadway Cleaners, for more than 30 years. Once known as the Girl Scout office, the house is now a single family home. Located near the Historic General Dodge House.

 

Everest House

125-s-3rd-streetOWNER/HOST:  James Kieffer, Jr. and Gary Lopez
ADDRESS:  125 South Third Street
YEAR BUILT: 1908
STYLE:  Tudor Revival
NRHP LISTED:  Within Bluff/Willow/Third Street Historic District

The house was designed by J. Chris Jensen and built in 1908 for Frank Everest and his wife Florence (Folsom) Everest. Frank was president of Greenshield-Everest Real Estate Company and president of First National Bank. The Tudor Revival style house retains the original walnut paneling in the foyer, walnut trim in the living room, and oak woodworks, a built-in cabinet and wainscoting in the dining room. This was the boyhood home of Frank and George Everest, who became generals.

McDonald/ Sylvester House

McDonald/Schuster-2126EastKanesvilleBlvdOWNER/HOST: Roxanne (Johnson) and Wright Smith
ADDRESS:  2126 East Kanesville Boulevard
YEAR BUILT: 1857
STYLE:  Greek Revival

The McDonald-Sylvester House is one of the oldest known homes in Council Bluffs. Its Greek Revival architecture was popular in the United States during the pre-Civil War years, in commercial buildings and in the large homes in the southern coastal states. The McDonalds named the property “Rosegien.” McDonald and his wife, Adelphia, took in school teachers as boarders. One was William H. Kinsman – teacher, lawyer and Civil War hero. Another was John A. Sylvester, whom Adelphia married after the death of her husband, Milton.

O.P. Wickham House

616 South Seventh StreetOpening Cocktail Reception – Guests receive house assignments 

OWNER/HOST:  Lloyd Menard
ADDRESS: 616 South Seventh Street
YEAR BUILT: 1882
STYLE:  Queen Anne/Eastlake
NRHP LISTED:  June 18, 1979

Owen P. Wickham was a contractor with the firm Wickham Bros. Construction Co. He was also a brick manufacturer. The house was built for O.P. and his wife Cecilia. It is a Queen Anne/Eastlake style house with concrete trim and features outstanding Victorian woodwork on both the interior and exterior. O.P. and James Wickham, built many of the brick streets and commercial buildings in and around Council Bluffs. Their work was seen at the Grand Hotel, the original Pottawattamie County Courthouse and St. Francis Zavier and St. Peter Catholic churches.

Chiodo House

chiodo-1004south25thaveOWNER/HOST:  Barry Burt and Michael Heaton
ADDRESS:  1004 South 25th Avenue, Omaha, NE
YEAR BUILT: 1922
STYLE:  Foursquare

This house was built for Vincenzo and Carolyn Chiodo. The house features lots of stained glass, marble salvaged from the old Omaha courthouse and original mahogany woodwork. The house served as the Italian Consulate during the 1920s and 1930s. Chiodo was born in Adami, Italy, in 1870. He arrived in Omaha in 1884 at the age of 14. In the early part of the 20th century, the U.S. census listed his occupation as “Ladies Tailoring”, and later, “real estate.” He owned 50 rental properties and built several apartment buildings which are still standing. By 1929 he was rated Omaha’s only Italian millionaire. He entertained many influential people in his home.

Dine with us

Be a Guest at Next Year’s Spring Soirée for Preservation

Whether you will be a returning guest or a new participant, we welcome you to dine with us in one of next year’s historic homes.

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